Future Norths Charette

Speakers

Ysanne Holt – University of Northumbria | northernperipheries.wordpress.com

Angela McClanahan – University of Edinburgh | northernperipheries.wordpress.com

Neil Mulholland – University of Edinburgh | www.neilmulholland.co.uk

Louise Thody – University of Edinburgh | www.eca.ed.ac.uk/eca-home/louise-thody

Stephen Hurrell – Artist, Glasgow | www.hurrelvisualarts.com 

“The term charrette, meaning cart in French, and its prominence in design education is rooted in the L’E ́ cole des Beau Arts where students’ projects were collected and placed in a cart en route to final review (Sanoff, 2000). In today’s studios, the term charrette is associated with developing a creative design solution, often in an intensive participatory or group format, within a shortened period ranging from one day to two weeks.” – Jason B. Walker and Michael W. Seymour Utilizing the Design Charrette for Teaching Sustainability.

Structure and Format

The charrette will be hosted at Timespan, Helmsdale. There is no limit to the number of participants and no need to prepare for the charrette. It will consist of a morning and afternoon session.

Timings

10:00-10:30 ////// Arrival

10:30 ////// Presentations: Angela & Ysanne will give presentations on the Northern Peripheries Network and their research on Northern cultures.

11:00 ////// Group Work 1

We will start the first of two break out sessions. Groups of participants will discuss the parameters of what we consider, today, to be “The North” or “Northern”. We ask the groups to list their ideas in relation to the following three criteria:

Positive how and why is the north presented as a positive attribute, what are its strengths?

Negative how and why is the north regarded pejoratively?

Conditions what conditions are required to enable ‘northern-ness’?

11:45 ////// Feedback 1

Through feedback and discussion, we will attempt to generate a consensus around the group regarding the positive, negative aspects of the north and the conditions that make northernness possible.

12:30 ////// BREAK 

1:00 ////// BREAK Presentations: Louise & Stephen will give presentations on their research.

1:30 ////// Group Work 2

After the second set of presentations we will reconvene the second of two break out sessions. Taking our conditions of northernness as a base for discussion – the groups will discuss their views on future norths. What is probable?

Groups of participants will discuss the parameters of what we consider, today, to be “The North” or “Northern”. We ask the groups to list their ideas in relation to the following three criteria:

Possible – What sort of north is possible in the future (good and bad)?

Preferable – What would be the preferable future for the north? How could this be implemented?

Probable – if Conditions remain as they are now, what is the most probable future for the north?

2:30 ////// Feedback 2

Each group will, in turn, tell the charrette the story of their future norths. Start by discussing your possibilities, then move on to what’s preferable before discussing what is probable.

Each group will get feedback from the charrette as a whole regarding their future narrative.

We will conclude by voting for the future north preferred by the charrette as a whole.

3:30 ////// FIN: We expect the charrette to end by 3:30pm

Future Norths is supported by Timespan, the AHRC Northern Peripheries Group and the Masters of Contemporary Art, School of Art, The University of Edinburgh.

northernperipheries.wordpress.com | timespan.org.uk

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